We Out Here – Ep1 Trailer (full film available 1/25/24)

We are thrilled to bring you the trailer for episode 1 of the We Out Here web series by Waist Deep Media. Full film dropping 1/25/24 for free on YouTube!

Join host Gian Lawrence (Instagram @theblackstonefly) in central Oregon for this raw and powerful look into what makes Austin Leonard (Instagram @theburrrprint) simply one of the most talented, inspiring and fishy dudes anywhere. Monster browns and skated steelhead provide some incredible fish porn but it’s Austin’s willingness to tell his story that really steals the show. Mark your calendar!

#steelhead #filmseries #filmmaking #shortfilm #browntrout #wildsteelhead #swingingforsteelhead #steelheadonthefly #wildbrowntrout #MadetoWade #DRYFTculture #DRYFT

Planting Trees Along Salmon Streams

Recently we met up with the Nooksack Salmon Enhancement Association for a brisk morning of planting native trees and plants along a small salmon stream. This was a fun time with family and friends, and gave us the chance to get our hands dirty and help replant a small stretch of stream bank along a local waterway. 

All year long we partner with One Tree Planted, who coordinates planting trees where they are most needed along salmon bearing streams in the Pacific Northwest. For every wader we sell One Tree Planted plants one tree. This has been a good partnership for us because we like fish, and trees provide fish in the river with the shade, cool water, and structure they need to survive. 

We hope you’ll join us in donating to conservation this year.  You can make a contribution to One Tree Planted directly here – https://onetreeplanted.org/

Lastly, you can read more about our commitment to conservation and sustainability at dryftfishing.com/conservation.

Why are the strap buckles on chest waders opposing?

The front wader strap buckles are attached with opposite ends of the buckle to each side of the top on all DRYFT chest waders. Opposing buckles in this way makes it so that they can be clipped together, to make it possible to hang them from tent poles, racks or hanging rods without the use of a hook or hanger. It also helps the wearer find the right clip when pulling them over the shoulder. Another use that isn’t in the video, but was mentioned by a commenter is that the straps can be clipped together in front of the wearers neck, so that the front of the waders can be pulled down (for on river relief – talking to you men), and then the straps aren’t floating free and lost behind your back when it comes time to pull the front back up and buckle up.

Happy fishing!

Carrying a trout net with the BKCNTRY Fishing Backpack – This is how we do it.

Welcome to another Tips and Tricks video. In this video Nick shows how he carries his mid-length trout net while fishing with the BKCNTRY fishing backpack. In a previous video Jordan showed how he carries a long handle guide net, and this builds on that video by showing three additional ways to carry a net in an easy to reach position. Drop us a comment with questions or comments. Happy fishing!

Previous video where Jordan shows how he carries his long handle guide net in his DRYFT fishing backpack.

Easy fly change tip with Jordan

This is a neat tip from Jordan Young-Treadway @treadwatersfly on how to tame your Skagit head and sink tip while swapping a fly without reeling in any line at all. If you’re working through a run and want to make sure that you start again at the same distance, this trick lets you easily swap flies without reeling in your line. Without tying off to your rod like Jordan shows here your fly line will float away and tug on your tippet, making swapping flies more difficult. Happy fishing!

Carrying a long handle net with the BKCNTRY 25 Backpack

Here is Jordan Young-Treadway (@treadwatersfly on Instagram) showing how he carries his long handle guide net on walk and wade trips. By looping it through the net holding loop at the bottom of his BKCNTRY backpack and also supporting the top with the roll top clips, it makes the net easily accessible when it’s time to scoop up a fish. Happy fishing out there. 

Zipper Cleaners – why, how and when to clean your zippers

We recommend cleaning and lubricating the zippers on waders on a regular basis.  Zipper Cleaner and Lubricant and Zipper Lubricant Stick from Gearaid do the job nicely and will help keep your zippers operating smoothly and performing like they should.  If your zipper is dirty, or isn’t running as smoothly as it once did then pick up one or both of the products mentioned here and fix it up. Happy fishing!

Neoprene Gravel Guards – Why are they tight fitting?

We get asked about the tightness of the neoprene gravel guards on the Primo Zip GD and S14 waders. We designed them to be tight fitting for one main reason – to keep sand and gravel out of your boot. Loose fitting gravel guards can allow sand, silt, and gravel to get up inside the boot, and can get pushed up by heavy current unless securely hooked in place. More about the lace hook below.

But first, let’s talk about the function of gravel guards. In this video I had been wading through a side channel that was full of thick and deep silty sand and mud. With each step I was sinking into the mud, and even though I had been wading in fast current only moments before the gravel guard was still firmly in place where it needed to be to keep the inside of my boots clean and clear of sand, mud and gravel.

Check out this short video for a detailed view of how I use the gravel guards

Tuck it up inside

The functional purpose of a tight gravel guard is that it makes the lace hook somewhat redundant, and in some cases the lace hook may not even need to be used. Fit is going to be different for everyone, depending on wader size and boot size, so this may not apply to everyone. Also, some boots have a lace hook attachment near where the gravel guard sits naturally, and some boots do not. For me, the gravel guards fit tightly enough over the boot that I don’t need to use the lace hook at all. I just tuck it up inside the gravel guard itself. The guard doesn’t move on me, even when wading in the heaviest currents.

Avoid damaging your boots and waders

I like tucking the lace hook up inside the gravel guard (and not attaching it to the boot) because stretching the gravel guard way down towards the toe on a boot, where the hook is located on some boots, can pull and put stress on multiple parts of the wader and on the boot and boot laces. My waders and boots they last longer for me because I don’t do this.

This can happen if the lace hook doesn’t reach easily or comfortably. If it doesn’t reach easily, we don’t use it.

Something to keep in mind is that straight out of the box the neoprene gravel guards may seem tight, but they will loosen up a bit over time and become easier to pull down over your boot. They are designed to keep sand and gravel out of your boots, and will do their job well with or without the lace hook.

Happy fishing!

-Nick